Thou art the investigator without knowledge, the magistrate without jurisdiction, and, after all, the fool of the farce. (MICHEL DE MONTAIGNE)

Thou art the investigator without knowledge, the magistrate without jurisdiction, and, after all, the fool of the farce. (MICHEL DE MONTAIGNE)

The uniformity and simplicity of my manners produce a face of easy interpretation; but because the fashion is a little new and not in use, it gives too great opportunity to slander. Yet so it is, that whoever would fairly assail me, I think I so sufficiently assist his purpose in my known and avowed imperfections, that he may that way satisfy his ill-nature without fighting with the wind. If I myself, to anticipate accusation and discovery, confess enough to frustrate his malice, as he conceives, ‘tis but reason that he make use of his right of amplification, and to wire-draw my vices as far as he can; attack has its rights beyond justice; and let him make the roots of those errors I have laid open to him shoot up into trees: let him make his use, not only of those I am really affected with, but also of those that only threaten me; injurious vices, both in quality and number; let him cudgel me that way.

I should willingly follow the example of the philosopher Bion: Antigonus being about to reproach him with the meanness of his birth, he presently cut him short with this declaration: “I am,” said he, “the son of a slave, a butcher, and branded, and of a strumpet my father married in the lowest of his fortune; both of them were whipped for offences they had committed. An orator bought me, when a child, and finding me a pretty and hopeful boy, bred me up, and when he died left me all his estate, which I have transported into this city of Athens, and here settled myself to the study of philosophy. Let the historians never trouble themselves with inquiring about me: I will tell them about it.” A free and generous confession enervates reproach and disarms slander.

So it is that, one thing with another, I fancy men as often commend as undervalue me beyond reason; as, methinks also, from my childhood, in rank and degree of honour, they have given me a place rather above than below my right.

If other men would consider themselves at the rate I do, they would, as I do, discover themselves to be full of inanity and foppery; to rid myself of it, I cannot, without making myself away. We are all steeped in it, as well one as another; but they who are not aware on’t, have somewhat the better bargain; and yet I know not whether they have or no.

This opinion and common usage to observe others more than ourselves has very much relieved us that way: ’tis a very displeasing object: we can there see nothing but misery and vanity: nature, that we may not be dejected with the sight of our own deformities, has wisely thrust the action of seeing outward. We go forward with the current, but to turn back towards ourselves is a painful motion; so is the sea moved and troubled when the waves rush against one another. Observe, says every one, the motions of the heavens, of public affairs; observe the quarrel of such a person, take notice of such a one’s pulse, of such another’s last will and testament; in sum, be always looking high or low, on one side, before or behind you. It was a paradoxical command anciently given us by that god of Delphos: “Look into yourself; discover yourself; keep close to yourself; call back your mind and will, that elsewhere consume themselves into yourself; you run out, you spill yourself; carry a more steady hand: men betray you, men spill you, men steal you from yourself. Dost thou not see that this world we live in keeps all its sight confined within, and its eyes open to contemplate itself? ‘Tis always vanity for thee, both within and without; but ’tis less vanity when less extended. Excepting thee, O man, said that god, everything studies itself first, and has bounds to its labours and desires, according to its need. There is nothing so empty and necessitous as thou, who embracest the universe; thou art the investigator without knowledge, the magistrate without jurisdiction, and, after all, the fool of the farce.”

 

 

 

 

The Essays of Montaigne
Michel de Montaigne



Facebook

Instagram

Follow Me on Instagram
  • Wisdom is avoiding all thoughts that weaken you .

    lecturesbureau: "Wisdom is avoiding all thoughts
that weaken you ."
    76
    0
  • Man's main task in life is to give birth to himself , to become what he potentially is .

    lecturesbureau: "Man's main task in life
is to give birth to himself ,
to become what he potentially is ."
    169
    0
  • Open your eyes , look within . Are you satisfied with the life you're living ?

    lecturesbureau: "Open your eyes , look within .
Are you satisfied with the life you're living ?"
    201
    1
  • Gratitude is the sign of noble souls .

    lecturesbureau: "Gratitude is the sign of noble souls ."
    284
    0
  • We are the creators of ourselves .

    lecturesbureau: "We are the creators of ourselves ."
    282
    0
  • A book read by a thousand different people is a thousand different books .

    lecturesbureau: "A book read by a thousand different people
is a thousand different books ."
    318
    0
  • What is beautiful is moral .

    lecturesbureau: "What is beautiful is moral ."
    314
    1
  • The beauty doesn't make happy the owner , but the one who can love and admire her .

    lecturesbureau: "The beauty doesn't make happy the owner ,
but the one who can love and admire her ."
    225
    1
  • If you see a friend without a smile , give him one of yours .

    lecturesbureau: "If you see a friend without a smile ,
give him one of yours ."
    500
    2
  • When the mind is pure , joy follows like a shadow that never leaves .

    lecturesbureau: "When the mind is pure ,
joy follows like a shadow that never leaves ."
    307
    0